Volunteer Opportunities & Training

Left: Jane Wilson accepts 2013 Volunteer of the Year award from Denise Homer. Right: 2013 Annual Meeting attendees enjoy the luncheon.

The need for volunteers has grown over the years. All tours need at least one trained docent to accompany the group, whether on weekdays or weekends. Tours are tailored to the participants' interests and age level and may include birds, plants, wetland ecology, Marsh history, or the wastewater treatment process.

In 2012, FOAM tried a new approach from its usual volunteer recruitment and training regimen of fall and spring weekend lectures/field trips. A series of monthly lectures for the general public on Marsh-related topics began in August, in the hope that they would attract volunteers. Potential docents would receive a CD of background material and recommended points along the trails to stop and discuss various topics. Current tour leaders serve as mentors, with recruits shadowing at least two tours before being certified.

FOAM hosts a volunteer appreciation luncheon as part of its annual meeting where Volunteer of the Year awards are presented.

You don't have to lead a tour to serve as a FOAM volunteer. There is a huge need for people to staff the information desk on weekends and sporadic weekdays or to be on call for special events, giving just a few hours a year by staffing a booth at community events such as Godwit Days, the local birding festival held each April.

In 2012, a full-color brochure was produced that details volunteer opportunities at the Marsh, illustrated with quotes from and photos of volunteers in action.

In 2012, a subcommittee led by Jenny Hanson and Elliott Dabill recommended changes to the current volunteer recruitment and training regimen (e.g., fall and spring weekends of lectures/field trips). A series of monthly lectures for the general public on Marsh-related topics began in August 2012 (see Special Tours, Events, and Lectures subsection on Education page), in the hope that they will attract potential volunteers. Current tour leaders will serve as mentors for interested people, who need to "shadow" at least two tours before being certified.

FOAM also has 11 standing committees that need members beyond the Board of Directors. These committees coordinate special events, tours, and volunteers; consult on new interpretive center exhibits; revamp FOAM's educational efforts; carry out habitat enhancement projects; and update this website. Hours vary with the task.